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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
. dockworkers at some of the nation's biggest ports could walk off the job this weekend, if a new labor deal isn't reached. as allison worrell reports, a strike could ripple far beyond the ports. >> reporter: if a deal isn't reached by 12:01 a.m. sunday, union dock-workers will take to the picket-line. 15 ports span the east and gulf coasts. and while they're in different locations, handling different types of cargo, they all agree, a strike would be very bad for business. >> it's really important for the people in our country to recognize, in this state, that a strike combined with the ongoing negotiations between congress and president obama regarding, um, the so-called fiscal cliff could be a one, two combination knock out for nation's economy. >> if a strike does happen that means a big chunk of the more than 14,000 members of the international longshoresmen association will be off the job. >> reporter: the ports impacted generate an estimated $11 billion in state and local taxes annually. but losses from any strike will be felt far beyond the coast, with industries as diverse as agriculture
in washington this weekend. >> port: thpresident declared himself modestly optimistic congress could still reach an agreement to head off huge tax hikes on january first, but he also warned lawmakers to get their work done. >> the american people are not going to have patience with a self-inflicted wound on the economy. >> reporter: senate republican leader mitch mcconnell called the white house meeting a good one and he told his fellow republicans he hoped to have a fiscal cliff recommendation soon. >> we will be working hard to see if we can get there in next 24 hours and so i am hopeful and optimistic. >> reporter: but the sticking point remains finding something that can make it through the house with enough support from republicans. >> it seems like the 250 threshold that the president proposed previously is unlikely to pass the house in its current form, and so without some sort of additional compromise there, it seems unlikely that we're going to get something done before the end of the year. >> susie: you know thanks for that report. i am just wondering from all of the reporting you have
and long beach port workers were back at work today, ending a costly eight-day strike. the ports were crippled after clerical workers went on strike and were supported by the longshoreman's union, which refused to cross the picket line. the shutdown cost $1 billion a day. the work stoppage also forced ships to reroute to ports in mexico, panama and northern california. a tentative deal was reached late last night after federal mediators joined negotiations. no details yet on the deal, but workers are expected to get new terms that will prevent jobs from being outsourced. >> tom: we saw the influence of apple on any stk inx which includes it. without apple, the dow rallied. but the nasdaq and s&p 500 were weighed down thanks to apple's weakness. the s&p 500 hit its lowest level of the session just after a stronger than expected report on the services sector before 11:00 a.m. eastern time. it bounced into positive territory and closed up 0.2%. volume picked up a little on the big board with 757 million shares. 1.8 billion moved on the nasdaq. the technology sector was the big drag on th
. the nation's busiest port complex is back in business after an eight-day strike halted operations. the ports of los angeles and long beach, california reopened today after port operators and the worker's union reached an agreement late tuesday. the union said it won new protections against job outsourcing. port officials said during the walkout, they were unable to move some $760 million worth of cargo a day. wall street had a day of ups and downs and investors watched economic reports and weighed chances for a fiscal cliff deal in washington. the dow jones industrial average gained more than 82 points to close at 13,034. but the nasdaq fell nearly 23 points to close at 2,973. the day's big loser was apple, down more than 6% over concerns that smart phone sales are lagging. former texas congressman jack brooks has died. he served 42 years in the house, and was in the dallas motorcade on november 22nd, 1963 when president kennedy was assassinated. hours later, brooks was on hand as vice president and fellow texan lyndon johnson was sworn in to the presidency. later, brooks helped author the 1
: there's also the "container cliff". 14 ports along the u.s. east and gulf coasts are at risk of closing if longshoremen and the international maritime alliance cannot reach a deal by saturday. federal mediators have been called in to help with last minute negotiations. at the heart of the dispute: container royalties. those fees charged to shippers were implemented in the 1960s to help dock workers displaced by technology. the maritime alliance wants the royalties capped. earlier this month a port strike in southern california, cost an estimated $1 billion a day. netflix is blaming problems at its web service provider, amazon for a server outage that took down its streaming video service on christmas eve and into christmas day. netflix says it worked through the night with engineers at amazon to get the service back up and running. netflix shares rebounded today, rising almost 2%, while amazon shares fell nearly 4%. >> susie: amazon was just one of many stocks in the red today. as we mentioned earlier, stocks were dragged lower by the retail sector after a report showed consumers did no
port-related issues are leading the gains as the weakening trend of the yen is continuing. so let's take a look at the currency markets. the dollar is higher against the yen. that's on better than expected nonmanufacturing data out of the u.s. 82.40-43. euro/yen, that's in the mid 107 yen levels this thursday morning. taking a look at other markets in the asia-pacific, south korea's companiespy is 1949. let's take a look at australia. the benchmark index is lower by about.25%, 4508. let's see where china takes us when they open the next hour. >>> european commission regulators have imposed a fine worth almost $2 billion for running two price-fixing cars sells. they say it's the highest-ever anti-trust penalty in their history. the commission leaders said they fined six companies a total of $1.47 billion euros for anti-competitive behavior. the firms are panasonic and toshiba, samsung sdi and lg electronics, phillips and technicolor. they say the officials of those companies met a number of times until 2006 to manipulate prices of cathode ray tubes, a component used at the time in
drills in the persian gulf. no japanese vessel has ever made a port visit to the country. myanmar was under military rule for almost 25 years. the nation has been strengthening ties with japan and western nations since its transition to civilian rule in march of last year. but the country's leaders have also been trying to maintain close ties with china. japan's new government has promised to repair frayed ties with south dakota. he spoke with south korea's kim a day after taking office, saying south korea is japan's most important neighbor and they share fundamental values and interests. he alluded to a dispute over the senkaku islands in the sea of japan. kim said it's important to maintain close communications. they agreed to work closely on issues relating to north korea. >>> japanese government officials may be looking forward to the new year, but they have to sort through a slew of economic data first. so what can you tell us? >> you're right, they can't kick up their heels just yet, because they have a handful of economic indicators to sort through for japan for november. t
"battleground dispatches." >> reporter: when residents of this port city wake up, even if there wasn't a storm that night, they regularly find some streets flooded from high tides. it is a far cry from the storm surges brought by sandy further up the coast, but that super- storm, which hit the week before election day, brought to the surface the issue of rising sea levels, the vulnerability of coastal cities and what can be done to protect them. in national exit polls, 64% of voters said that president obama's response to the hurricane was a factor in their decision. >> what i will be doing in the next several months is having wide ranging conversations with scientists, engineers and elected officials to find out what more can we do. >> reporter: mr. obama might look to norfolk, where they have been having those conversations for years. >> as we get more high tides and tides seem to get higher and we get more of these storms and they seem to come with a little more fury we get more and more water in our city as the days go by, so we are taking it very seriously. we talk about it nearly monthl
. >> susie: thas "nightly business port" r weesday, decber 19 have a great evening everyone, and you too tom. >> tom: goodnight susie, we'll see you online at: www.nbr.com and back here tomorrow night. captioning sponsored by wpbt captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> join us anytime at nbr.com. there, you'll find full episodes of the program, complete show transcripts and all the market stats. also follows us on our facebook page at bizrpt. and on twitter @bizrpt.
just outside the capital port-au-prin, this doctor says since hurricane sandy admissions have doubled from 20 to 40 patients each day. >> most of the new cases are coming from further up the hill in places where we had not seen them before. i'm not positive but perhaps the wells there have been contaminated. >> reporter: experts believe cholera was brought here by u.n. peacekeepers. untreated sewage from this base flowed into a tributary of the river, the major source of water foroth washing and drinking. cholera is spread by fecal-oral contact. two years on 200,000 patients have been sickened, 750 d 7,500 have died from diarrhea and fluid loss. each flood brings more contaminated water, more cases. the epidemic prompted massive relief efforts and public campaigns. on the streets and in classrooms promoting hygiene and sanitation. fatalities have dropped from 10% of cases early on to about 1%. still, 600 people have died from cholera this year. many in remote areas even those unaffected by floods. there's now plenty of awareness of cholera in haiti. the biggest challenge for people to
is america's top producing fishing port and sea scallops-- another species vulnerable to acidification-- makes up 77% of their production. >> shell fishing is really a way of life for many ofhose families and much of that community and taking that away kind of further homogenizes our country. we could see changes in the demographics of the community as working families move away and look for other opportunities. >> sreenivasan: sarah cooley studies the socio-economic impacts of altered oceans at woods hole oceanographic institution in massachusetts. she and other researchers project acidification could reduce u.s. shellfish harvests by as much as 25% over the next 50 years. >> we'll look back and say oh things used to be like this and i hope that's not the case. i hope we can actually preserve those pockets of individuality in the country that make it so great by finding these regional solutions can help out different regions to preserve their ways of life. >> what we are looking at is probably on the order of tens to hundreds of millions of dollars just related to the shellfish fisher
because they know them the best then we work together. >> in the sprawling port-au-prince slum, he says the group is partnering with the community to build homes in a sea of shacks and squall already. they're built on the principle that if you wait to do things right nothing will get done for years. prolonging the suffering. >> we're investing in the purchase of time, there's simple block structures, we make most of them ourselves, simple aluminum -- more towards normal than anything that they have known but just buying time while the people with big money and big plans and interwoven network of organizations can do a proper urban development. that's what we're doing. >> they're also building a new health care facility here, all told about 1800 haitians work for the mission begun by him, hundreds of thousands have been served in orphanages, schools and hospitals. funding comes from individuals, foundations and government grants. this year he was awarded the $1 million opus prize given to a faith-based social entrepreneur out of the minnesota-based opus foundation. he does not see his w
of the ship, port to the iceberg dead ahead and demand that the captain change course before it's too late. they, the gun industry, its profiteers, zealots, and apoll gists, its political stooges and constitutional originalists who would think that the 18th century really means perpetuating a wild wet here in the 20th century. don't tread on us. get off our well-armed backs. there's nothing you can do. of course there is. register all guns, license all gun owners. require stringent background checks. get tough on assault weapons of ankind. crack down on high capacity ammunition, as the president has now proposed. then, enforce the laws. yes, i know. determined killers will always find a way, but we can minimize the opportunities and scale back the scope of destruction. why do we accept the need for driver's licenses or submit to the sometimes humiliating body scans at airports? because it's the law, and deep down we know we're safer for the inconvenience of the law. good laws are hard to come by. civilization, just as hard. the rough and tumble of politics makes them so. but democracy aims
holman. >> holman: the u.s. economy has dodged a potentially crippling strike at ports up and down the east coast and gulf coast at least, for now. the longshoremen's union agreed today to extend its existing contract by another month. that word came after the union and shipping lines worked out a deal on royalty payments for unloading containers. the contract extension gives the two sides time to resolve their remaining issues. walstreet finished the week with its fifth straight losing session. stocks have been falling as concern mounts that washington will fail to get a budget deal. the dow jones industrial average lost 158 points today, to close at 12,938. the nasdaq fell 25 points to close at 2,960. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq fell 2%. sectarian tensions flared across iraq today as tens of thousands of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. today, mosul, tikrit and samarra had demonstrations as well. protesters took to the streets waving flags
and shippers to avoid a crippling strike at atlantic and gulf coast ports. it would be the first since 1977. the workers' union contract expires this weekend, and a white house spokesman said today the two sides need to agree on a contract extension as soon as possible. talks broke down last week in a dispute over wages and royalties. the christmas season storm that blasted the south and midwest swept across the upper northeast and new england today and the death count climbed to 16. the system dumped a foot or more of snow in parts of pennsylvania, upstate new york and new hampshire. in some places, snow brought road travel to a standstill. at the same time, operations at major airports improved, with far fewer delays than earlier this week. in india, the embattled prime minister remained under pressure to take action against sexual assaults after a gang rape this month triggered violent protests. manmohan singh promised a thorough review of india's rape laws and efforts to expedite trials. meanwhile, police moved to quell a rally by about 500 students protesting the treatment of women as
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)